Archive for November 2010

The Lemonade Stand Principle: 4 Lessons For Your Career (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 29, 2010

With over 70% of all jobs being filled through personal contacts and networking, networking is clearly the #1 job search strategy.  However, you may be thinking, “Why would someone want to help me, especially if I am not able to do anything for them?”

Consider this… Did you ever have a lemonade stand as a child?

As a boy, my younger brother and I would have lemonade stands every summer as a way to make extra cash.  We would set up a table and chairs on the corner of the street we lived on in the suburbs of Long Island, NY, and people would always stop and buy our lemonade.

Now, did people buy our product because they were so thirsty that they could not wait to get to their final destination to grab something to drink?  Nope. 

Did they purchase our lemonade because it was so delicious that they could not resist it? Nope.  It really wasn’t that good! 

Instead, people bought our lemonade because of something I have coined “The Lemonade Stand Principle,” which contains 4 lessons for your career:

1. Enthusiasm is magnetic.  Because we were so excited about our lemonade stand, my brother and I inspired people to help us (by buying our product).  As a job-seeker (or as a salesperson or entrepreneur), you must have that same passion about your current or future career goals.  If you do, people will be motivated to help you. If not, networking will not work!

2. Youth is an advantage in business.  How do you think I would do now if I set up a lemonade stand on the corner of the street I grew up on?  I doubt that many people would stop and support me now (at the age of 29), even if they had supported my lemonade stand when I was a boy.  The message is that youth is a huge advantage when you are trying to achieve anything.  As you get older, people will feel less and less inclined to help you without getting anything in return.  Use your youth to your advantage, and do not feel guilty about it.  You can return the favor in the future.

3. We love to help people who remind us of ourselves.  Successful older executives LOVE ambitious students and young professionals.  When looking at you, older execs see who they were 10, 20, 30, or 40 years ago.  They remember the challenges they went through at the start of their careers, and they remember how other people helped them get started.  If you approach people the right way, you will be amazed at who will support you.  This happened to me when I looked for a job as a 21 year-old student.  It also happened when I started my business 2 years ago at the age of 27.

4. It feels good to help others.  Older professionals often tell me that the joy they receive in knowing they helped a student or young professional is the only “payment” they need.  You should still always try to return a favor.  However, understand that by thanking someone for their support and by taking action on their advice, you give the greatest gift of all: appreciation.

You don’t have to go through any journey alone!  You will be amazed at who will help you when you approach people the right way.

Do you have a story of how someone helped you in your career without expecting anything in return?  If so, please comment below.

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

Twitter: @peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com.

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4 Ways to Figure Out What Your Dream Job Is (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 26, 2010

According to a recent report by Success Magazine, 85% of employed Americans are NOT fully satisfied with their careers.  Is this because the average person was not good enough to get a job that would have been ideal?  I certainly don’t think so.

Instead, the primary cause of job dissatisfaction is that the average person never takes the time to identify what his/her dream job is.  Most people just take the first job they can get, and then, they are somehow surprised when they don’t like their jobs.  If you are unsatisfied with your current career and not sure what you want to do next, here are 4 ways to help you identify your dream job:

  1. Try.  As I have written before, a dream job is “a job that combines your talents and passions in a way that is meaningful to you.”  The best way to find out what you like to do and what you are good at is through personal experience.  Take a variety of courses, travel to new places, read about different subjects, volunteer, intern, and try to put yourself in as many different environments as possible.  You might be surprised to find out what you are good at and what you enjoy doing.
  2. Think.  Go somewhere peaceful by yourself and reflect on your life.  Ask yourself a series of questions.  When are you happiest?  When do you feel most confident?  What comes easily for you?  What do people compliment you on most?  Who do you admire?  What problems with our world would you like to fix?  What fascinates you?  Answers to these sorts of questions will shed light on your strengths, interests, and values and give you direction on what type of work to pursue.  If you don’t know what your passions and talents are, you probably need to start paying more attention to how you feel as you live your life. 
  3. Talk.  Find several people you trust, and ask for their help in brainstorming potential career paths based on what they consider your strengths to be.  By talking out loud with those you trust, you may uncover some ideas you had not previously considered.  Just be careful to speak to people who have your best interests at heart and people who will not try to push their desires on you.  It’s also highly recommended to talk to people in any fields you are considering.  You want to know as much as possible about a potential career before you pursue it.
  4. Test.  Career testing can also help you identify your passions and talents.  Several years ago, when I was unsure what to do next in my career, I took the Myers Briggs and Strong Interest Inventory.  The results of these tests helped me reaffirm that I wanted to pursue a career as a speaker, author, and entrepreneur.  Career testing may help you confirm what you already know, or it might shed light on your talents and passions if you are struggling to identify them on your own.  Check with your career center to see what types of career testing they offer.

The hardest part of getting your dream job is figuring out what your dream job is!  If you are not sure what your dream job is, you are certainly not alone.  To take charge of your career and identify your dream job, you need to try, think, talk, and test

Be patient with yourself.  Figuring out what you want to do is a process that usually does not happen as quickly as you would like.  You will probably also find that your career aspirations will change, as you get older and your interests, strenghts, and values evolve.  No matter what happens, remember that you can change directions at any time!  It’s never too late (or too early) to go after your dream job.  The time is always right.  Go after it NOW!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

Twitter: @peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

6 Ways to Look More Professional and Impressive Online (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 23, 2010

Have you “googled” yourself lately?  If not, why not?!  

Potential employers, clients, and business partners will definitely “google” you before deciding whether to hire you or work with you.  If that is not motivation enough, you better believe that potential romantic partners will also look you up online to check you out! 

After you “google” yourself, you might find that you do not seem to exist on the Internet (i.e. nothing comes up for your name), or you might not like what you find. 

Search engine marketing is well outside of my marketing/business expertise, but I do know that social media web sites rank very high for google search results.  Here’s some proof.  When I “googled” myself yesterday, here were the first 4 results that appeared.  Notice that they are links to my LinkedIn profile, my “Career Muscles” blog, and my Facebook page.

Google results for "Pete Leibman"

Here are 6 easy ways you can take control of what someone sees when “googling” you:

  1. Buy the domain name for your name (i.e. johnsmith.com).  This is important for 2 reasons.  First of all, it prevents someone else with the same name as you from setting up their own page at this address.  Secondly, if you have web site design background, you can build a basic web site that positions you the way you want to be seen.  Note: if the domain name for your name is not available, consider getting a domain name that includes your middle initial or middle name.
  2. Clean up your Facebook page.  Facebook also ranks very high when someone searches for you online.  As I have written before, employers will definitely be checking you out on Facebook as well.  Keep your Facebook page set to private, and be sure that you remove any unprofessional pictures, quotes, comments, or wall posts.
  3. Use a vanity name for your LinkedIn page.  After you create a GREAT LinkedIn profile, you can modify the web link for your profile and create what is known as a “vanity URL” to make your LinkedIn profile more searchable for your name.  See below for a screen shot for my vanity URL, along with where you can edit your web link for your LinkedIn profile:

Use a "vanity URL" for your LinkedIn profile

4. Set up a blog at yourname.wordpress.com.  As I have written before, blogging is a phenomenal way to strengthen and demonstrate your written communication skills.  Potential employers and clients will be impressed IF you produce high-quality content.  If you incorporate your name into your blog, your blog will also be very likely to pop up in search results for your name, like it does for me.

 5. Create a Twitter account for twitter.com/yourname.  Twitter also ranks high when someone searches for you online.  Just make sure your tweets are professional and that they add value to people who follow you.  My Twitter account shows up for me on page 1 of search results for my name (see below), and many of my tweets show up on subsequent pages of my search results.  Since my tweets are high-value and since I have a great headline on my Twitter page, my online identity is enhanced yet again. 

A link to my Twitter account on page 1 of my google results

6. Upload a few video testimonials on You-Tube.  I saved the best tip for last.  Get a flip camera (a high-quality HD camera is only $100-$200 these days), and get several 30-second video testimonials from bosses, colleagues, or customers.  Then, post these videos on YouTube with titles like “Testimonial for John Smith from ABC Company.”  I recently posted a video from a student who attended a presentation I made last month at Stanford University.  Now, the following shows up on page 1 when someone “googles” my name:

A link to a video testimonial for me on page 1 of my google results

There are all sorts of additional ways you can take control of your online identity, but applying the 6 social media secrets above will significantly improve your “google juice” and make you look much more professional and impressive online.  Looks matter!  Take control of your online identity NOW!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

Twitter: @peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

13 Secrets for Success at a Career Fair (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 22, 2010

While Career Fairs definitely have their drawbacks (i.e. intense competition), they should definitely be part of your job search strategy.  Here are 13 tips to maximize your chances of success at a Career Fair:

  1. Do your homework ahead of time.  Before arriving at a Career Fair, you should have a list of all the employers you want to visit.  You should also do some research on each of these companies by visiting their web sites and by reading through the job descriptions they have provided to attendees of the Career Fair.
  2. Bring your ammo.  Bring multiple copies of your resume, letters of recommendation, and personalized cover letters for each employer you plan to visit. Keep your materials paper-clipped together by employer in a portfolio pad.  Backpacks are NOT allowed!
  3. Dress your best.  Looks matter during the hiring process, and you will be more confident if you feel good about how you look.  Err on the side of being overdressed.   
  4. Arrive early.  This shows enthusiasm and might get you some more time with a recruiter.
  5. Warm-up.  Speak to recruiters from 2-3 companies you are not interested in before moving on to those you came to see.  A few “practice” conversations will loosen you up.
  6. Make the most of your time in line.  When you find yourself waiting in line to speak to a recruiter, talk to other people also waiting in line (this helps loosen you up).  
  7. Build rapport before you sell yourself.  Effective salespeople understand that they must build rapport with prospects before trying to sell their products, and you must do the same with recruiters at career fairs if you want them to “buy” you.  The first goal for any conversation at a Career Fair is to get the recruiter to like you.  Keep reading to learn how to do that in a genuine way…
  8. Make a great first impression In addition to dressing your best, you must smile, give a firm handshake, and make strong eye contact when first meeting a recruiter.  This sets the tone for the rest of the interaction.  Do not hand the recruiter your resume upon first meeting them.  Wait until you are asked for it, or provide it at the end of your conversation.
  9. Make 2 pitches.  Do not introduce yourself to recruiters with your 30-second elevator pitch.  Instead, introduce yourself with a mini-pitch, such as “Hi, my name is Mary Smith.  I’ve been looking forward to speaking to you about positions with ABC Company.  Can I ask you a few quick questions?”  After you ask a few questions, the recruiter will inevitably ask you about yourself.  Then, and only then, should you throw out your 30-second elevator pitch.  In your 30-second pitch (which you should have prepared ahead of time), you should provide a few reasons why you want to work for the company and why they should hire you.
  10. Ask great questions.  Prepare several questions for each employer in advance.  Avoid meaningless questions about company culture, salary, or hours.  Focus on thought-provoking questions that demonstrate you have given some thought to working for the company.  Click here for some ideas.
  11. Identify a next step.  Before ending any conversation with a recruiter, you should ask what the next step is in the process, and you should get a business card so that you can send a thank you note after the Career Fair.
  12. Stop by again.  Consider visiting each recruiter a 2nd time before you leave the Career Fair.  You could do this to ask one more question you “forgot to ask when we spoke initially.”  Make sure this is an intelligent question.  This is a good trick to help the recruiter remember who you were.
  13. Follow-up.  As with every job search strategy, proper follow-up after the Career Fair is essential to success.  Send each recruiter a personalized email within 24 hours.  Thank them for their time, try to reference something specific from your conversation (this helps them remember you), and quickly reiterate why you want to work for their company and how you can help make their company better.  You can also attach a copy of your resume, a personalized cover letter, and a letter of recommendation(s) to this email.  You can also drop a short handwritten note in the mail within 24 hours of the Career Fair.

In summary, you must treat each conversation at a career fair like an abbreviated job interview.  By showing up well-prepared and by following up correctly after the Career Fair, you can significantly increase your chances of being called in for a more formal job interview. 

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

Twitter: @peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

25 Things Students MUST Do In College (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 19, 2010

I speak to college students and recent grads about how they can get their dream jobs and achieve success after college.  Given that I am usually only speaking for 60-90 minutes, time limitations prevent me from telling the audience everything I wish I had known when I was a student.

Therefore, I took some time and identified a list of 25 things every student should do while in college to position himself/herself for success and happiness after college. 

If you are reading this and you have already graduated from college, please keep reading because this list will help you regardless of your age!  Just start doing these 25 things now, one by one.  I guarantee that you will achieve more success and happiness if you can incorporate these 25 things into your life after college:

  1. Lead. Take on a leadership position for an organization on-campus or off-campus.  Leadership skills are gold for your career, and they build confidence and strong communication skills.
  2. Travel/Study abroad.  By spending time in new places, you will build your confidence, open your mind, have fun, and meet interesting people.  One of my biggest regrets is that I did not study abroad in college. 
  3. Donate your time.  Volunteering for a cause that matters to you will make the world better, make you feel better about yourself, and make you more marketable to employers who will see you as a quality person.
  4. Do some dirty work.  Working a menial job that requires physical labor will build work ethic and character and make you more appreciative when you move up.  Or, it might help you realize that you like dirty work…
  5. Join a professional association.  The best way to break in to an industry is to join an industry association as a student.  You’ll have the opportunity to build relationships with people in the “real-world” who could hire you later on and/or who can introduce you to others who can.  This strategy helped me get my dream job to work in the NBA when I was 21!
  6. Start your own organization/club.  It will build your confidence, lead to new relationships, and strengthen your communication and leadership skills.  Employers will be very impressed by this initiative.
  7. Blog.  Start a blog at yourname.wordpress.com on any topic you are passionate about; just keep it respectable.  Write at least one 500-word, high-quality entry each month.  A well-written blog will really impress potential employers and it will build your writing skills. 
  8. Speak.  Find a Toastmasters club in your area and/or take a public speaking course.  The ability to speak confidently and competently in front of others is one of the most impressive skills a young professional can possess.  This will also increase your confidence exponentially.
  9. Start a rolodex.  Your personal and professional relationships will be your greatest asset in every area of your life.  Start cultivating them as early as you can.  Think of your network like a garden that you take pride in maintaining and growing.
  10. Choose your friends wisely.  Surround yourself with people with strong character, good attitudes, and similar values.  Your success and happiness will be directly related to the people you hang out with most.
  11. Reflect weekly.  Set a weekly 1-hour appointment with yourself to go somewhere quiet and reflect on your life.  Make sure you are headed where YOU want to be, not where others think you should be.  If you are headed down the wrong path in any area of your life, identify some steps you can take to change directions immediately.
  12.  Strengthen your body.  Exercise at least 3-4 times a week, and feed your body the right way.  A strong, healthy body will give you more energy, more confidence, and lead to better performance in every area of life.  Click here for tips on how to avoid the 9 major nutritional sins most Americans make.
  13. Nourish your mind.  Read uplifting material for at least 15 minutes EVERY day, and stop watching shows like The Jersey Shore.  Superficial TV shows are like cheeseburgers for your mind.  They make you “mentally obese!”
  14. Create your rules.  Take 1 weekend afternoon and establish 5-10 “rules” for how you will live your life.  Look over your rules each morning and night.  This keeps you on track.  Here are 5 of my rules for my life:
    1. To always do the right thing, no matter what
    2. To support, appreciate, and encourage everyone I interact with
    3. To pursue my dreams despite any doubters or obstacles
    4. To make my mind and body as pure and strong as possible
    5. To take full accountability for my life and make changes when necessary
  15. Set S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goals.  Everyone has heard that goals should be S.M.A.R.T. (specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-based), but that’s not sufficient.  Make them “S.M.A.R.T.E.R” by also recognizing the E.R. (“exciting reason”) for setting the goal.  Losing 10 pounds by next summer is a S.M.A.R.T. goal, but losing 10 pounds by next summer so that you will feel better about yourself at the beach is a S.M.A.R.T.E.R. goal.  Which do you think is more motivating?  “Exciting reasons” are essential for goal achievement.
  16. Intern.  Do an internship each year in college.  Click here for 11 reasons why this is important.
  17. Study outside your major.  After checking with your academic advisor to make sure this is allowed, take at least 1 course each semester not related to your major.  You might realize another subject interests you more than your current coursework.  Either way, you will open your mind.
  18.  Join LinkedIn.com.  Create a professional profile on LinkedIn (click here for tips), start building your professional network, and join LinkedIn groups relevant to your career aspirations so that you can learn more about your field and meet people who already work in it.
  19. Clean up your Facebook page.  Remove any questionable pictures, comments, quotes, or wall posts on your page.  Employers make judgments about you based on what they find online.
  20. Identify your passions.  Find out what gets you excited.  Make sure you pursue a career connected to your passions.
  21. Identify your talents.  Pay attention to what comes easily to you.  Make sure you pursue a career where you will be able to use those strengths on a daily basis.
  22. Rise early.  Make yourself a morning person.  There is no greater feeling than starting the day when most people are still sleeping.  Yes, this means you probably have to go to bed earlier.
  23. Count your blessings often.  Spend a few minutes right when you get up and right before bed to acknowledge everything you are thankful about.  It’s easy to lose track.
  24. Grow.  Complacency is the enemy of greatness and happiness.  Acknowledge and appreciate your accomplishments, but always keep challenging yourself and trying to get better.  Get out of your comfort zone as much as possible.
  25. Love yourself.  If you don’t like who you are, nothing else matters.  Success and happiness in life starts with appreciation for yourself!   

Do you want to create your ideal life after college?  Then, start doing these 25 things NOW!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

4 Ways to Break Into Any Industry (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 17, 2010

If you want to break into a competitive industry, a great way to do it is to “join” the industry first.  By “joining” the industry, you can get connected with people already working in your ideal field, and you will also gain access to industry information that will be valuable throughout all phases of your job search.  Here are the 4 best ways to “join” an industry: 

  1. Join professional associations for your ideal industry: Every industry has at least 1 major association.  Associations can operate on an international, national, regional, or state level; international and national organizations usually have regional or state chapters as well.  Many associations are open for anyone to join, and students and young professionals usually receive special membership discounts.  A few simple google searches will help you find relevant associations based on what you want to do.
  2. Attend conferences/events for your ideal industry: Most associations have an annual conference or regular events where current/potential members can get together in-person to exchange best-practices and build relationships.  There are also conferences and events not affiliated with a specific association.  Many industry networking events are open to anyone.  Again, students and young professionals usually qualify for reduced pricing.  In addition to finding conferences and events through professional associations, a few more simple google searches will help you find other relevant conferences and events in your area.
  3. Subscribe to publications/newsletters for your ideal industry:  Most associations also have a publication or newsletter in a print and/or online format.  Most of these resources are free for members, and others are available at a nominal fee.  In addition to subscribing to publications/newsletters for relevant associations, you can also do a few quick google searches to identify other sources worth following.
  4. Join social networking groups for your ideal industry: Most associations have groups on Facebook and LinkedIn where existing and potential members can come together online to network.  Given that it is a professional networking web site, LinkedIn provides a variety of networking opportunities that Facebook does not.  However, both are worth checking out.  Most groups on LinkedIn and Facebook are open to anyone, and they are always free to join.

In summary, if you want to break into an industry, just “join” the industry!  Then, it is very easy to get connected with people who can give you career advice and actual leads on how you can get hired in the industry.  This worked for me when I was in college!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

What image are you portraying on Facebook? (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 16, 2010

If a company is thinking about investing thousands of dollars into you by hiring you, you better believe that they are going to stalk you online to learn as much about you as possible.

Back in 2005, my younger brother, Matt, was interviewing for a summer internship position with a small PR firm in Philadelphia.  Since the company only had 6 employees, the President of the agency conducted interviews with potential interns.

Midway through the interview with my brother, the President looked at Matt and said, “Can you explain the following quote from your Facebook page to me?  On your page, you wrote ‘It’s not that I’m lazy.  It’s that I just don’t care.’  What did you mean by that?”

In case you have not seen the movie Office Space, that is a line from Peter Gibbons, the lead character of the movie (see above picture). 

My brother is actually one of the hardest working people I know, and he was just trying to be funny.  However, the person interviewing him was not laughing.  My brother ultimately got rejected for that position.

Here is the scariest part of that story.  My brother’s Facebook page was set to “private,” and the President of the company did not even have an account on Facebook.  (This was in 2005 when less than 5 million people were on the social networking web site; today, more than 500 million people use the site.)  The President was able to access my brother’s page through one of his interns who happened to be Facebook friends with my brother.  Through his intern, the hiring person had access to every quote, comment, wall post, and picture on my brother’s page.  Yikes…

Setting your Facebook page to private is a step in the right direction, but it is not enough.  With over 500 million people on Facebook and with most young professionals having hundreds of “friends,” it’s not a stretch to believe that a hiring person can find someone they know who is friends with you.  Once they find someone who has access to your page, they can then see EVERYTHING on your page.

It amazes me what people post on their pages for the world to see.  I have a friend who posts new pictures of himself weekly where he is either flexing with his shirt off and/or drunk at a party.  He looks like he’s trying to get cast on season 3 of the Jersey Shore!  Another one of my Facebook friends recently used extremely vulgar language when describing her ex.  Another friend often bashes her boss and colleagues through her wall posts.  I could go on and on and on.  Their online behavior certainly isn’t helping their chances of getting hired or promoted. 

In summary, you don’t’ need to be 100% buttoned-up online, but you do need to be smart about how you portray yourself to the world.

Don’t let one comment, quote, or picture be the reason you get rejected or fired from your dream job!  Keep everything on your Facebook page respectable, or prepare to be disrespected, unemployed and underpaid…

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for the 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com.