Archive for the ‘Elevator Pitch’ category

4.5 Keys for Making a Great First Impression (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

October 11, 2010

Strong communication skills are consistently ranked as the #1 skill employers desire in their employees.  However, communication is not just about what you say or write.  Communication also includes body language, and studies indicate that body language is significantly more important than actual language. 

Body language is especially important in a first impression.  In a matter of seconds, we automatically size up someone we meet.  These initial, subconscious judgments have very powerful consequences on how we are seen in future encounters; it is very challenging to overcome a bad first impression.

Recruiting directors, hiring persons, and senior executives frequently complain to me that most students make very poor first impressions.  Here are 4.5 keys on how you can S.H.E.D. this negative stereotype and position yourself the right way:

  1. SMILE: A genuine smile is inviting and contagious.  It conveys friendliness, removes barriers, and encourages others to want to get to know you.  A warm smile immediately makes you more likeable!
  2. HANDSHAKE: A strong handshake conveys confidence and integrity.  Having said that, do NOT try to devour the other person’s hand!  Just make a nice, firm shake.
  3. EYE CONTACT: Eye contact also indicates confidence.  Upon meeting someone, look them right in the eye for 2-3 seconds and then look away.  Like a suffocating handshake, eye contact can also be taken too far.  If you look into someone’s eyes for too long, you will make them uncomfortable.
  4. DRESS.  Err on the side of being over-dressed, but dress appropriately and professional for every situation.  And, don’t try to make fashion statements!  It is better to be conservative than flamboyant.

Bonus tip: Stand up straight and have good posture!  Good posture implies confidence as well.

Do you want to S.H.E.D. the negative stereotype associated with most young professionals?  When you meet someone for the first time, Smile, deliver a strong (not suffocating) Handshake, make direct Eye contact for 2-3 seconds, Dress appropriately for the situation, and stand up straight!  Do this, and you will be seen as confident, likeable, trustworthy, and friendly, 4 traits that will help you get your dream job and help you build better relationships with potential bosses, customers, and colleagues!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

www.IdealizeNow.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability, please email me at Pete@IdealizeNow.com.

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6 Elevator Pitch Do’s and Dont’s for Students and The Unemployed (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

July 30, 2010

If you are unemployed, don't do this when asked what you do!

If you are a student or unemployed adult who read yesterday’s post on elevator pitches, you may be thinking, “That’s great information, but what do I say at a networking event if I don’t have a job?!”  Well, here are 6 do’s and dont’s.

  1. Don’t improvise what you are going to say when people ask what you do.  Do have a concise response prepared.
  2. Don’t tell people you are “unemployed.” (While you might be out of a job for reasons beyond your control, there is a stigma associated with the word.)  Do have some sort of academic, volunteer, or part-time project that you are working on that you can reference as your current work.  Or, say something like “I am taking some time off to consider a career change.  I’m at this event to learn more about _____.”
  3. Don’t lie.  Do tell the truth.  The risk is not worth the reward.
  4. Don’t ask people for a job.  Do ask people if they have any advice on how you can learn more about opportunities in a given field.
  5. Don’t feel sorry for yourself.  A negative or defeated attitude will only turn off people who could potentially help you.  Do stay positive, as hard as that may be.
  6. Don’t focus strictly on how the other person can help you.  Do probe to see how you could help them. 

In summary, if you are a student or an unemployed adult, networking can be a great way to advance your career.  Just make sure you approach these events with the same positive attitude and preparation that you would if you already had a job!

-Pete Leibman

– Career Expert and President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

www.IdealizeNow.com

@peteleibman