Archive for the ‘Passion’ category

What Can The 2011 NBA Finals Teach You About Achieving Your Dreams? (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

June 14, 2011

Many people fail to get their dream job because they have a back-up plan.  Think about this logically.  By having a back-up plan, you are telling yourself that you might not succeed, which is exactly what you should not be thinking. 

Before I start to get letters from pessimistic parents or career counselors saying that this is bad advice to give students and young professionals “in this economy,” let me make sure you understand my message.

I am not saying that you should target one organization and remain unemployed rather than work for that employer.  Having any job is better than being unemployed given the stigma of being out of work.  What I am encouraging you to do is to commit to getting your dream job, no matter what it takes.  Sure, in the meantime, you may have to stay in a job you don’t love, or you may have to get a temporary job to pay bills.  However, you must commit 100% that you are going to get your dream job eventually.  No excuses.  No doubt.  It is going to happen.  It’s only a matter of when, not if.  It is that mindset that will actually help it happen because you will be more resilient and persistent.

If you knew you would die a slow, painful death if you did not get your dream job in the next six months, you would find a way to get it.  You would do absolutely whatever it took to get hired.  Why not approach your dreams with the same vigor? 

That probably sounds crazy, but most people completely miss the point of life and work. Don’t “plug along” in some job that you hate; go after your dreams with everything you have!  Hold absolutely nothing back, and you will succeed. 

A back-up plan is actually a plan for failure.  When you are willing to do whatever it takes, you will eventually achieve your dreams.

If you follow the NBA, you just witnessed Dirk Nowitzki and the Dallas Mavericks stun the world and knock off Lebron James, Dwayne Wade, Chris Bosh and the almighty Miami Heat.  Before the season started, no one expected the Dallas Mavericks to win the NBA title this year.  Well, no one except Jason Terry, shooting guard for the Mavs.  Before the 2010-2011 season began, Terry got a tattoo of the NBA Finals trophy on his right bicep. How’s that for committing to your dream?!

P.S. To receive a FREE 25-page report on Job Search and Career Success Secrets for Students and Young Professionals, visit my web site at www.PeteLeibman.com

 

-Pete Leibman (Pete@IdealizeNow.com)

-Author of “I Got My Dream Job And So Can You: The Blueprint For Career Success As A Young Professional” (due out through AMACOM in spring 2012)

-President of Idealize Enterprises

-Keynote Speaker for The Dream Job College Tour

Creator of The Washington Wizards’ Sports Careers Day

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4 Ways to Figure Out What Your Dream Job Is (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 26, 2010

According to a recent report by Success Magazine, 85% of employed Americans are NOT fully satisfied with their careers.  Is this because the average person was not good enough to get a job that would have been ideal?  I certainly don’t think so.

Instead, the primary cause of job dissatisfaction is that the average person never takes the time to identify what his/her dream job is.  Most people just take the first job they can get, and then, they are somehow surprised when they don’t like their jobs.  If you are unsatisfied with your current career and not sure what you want to do next, here are 4 ways to help you identify your dream job:

  1. Try.  As I have written before, a dream job is “a job that combines your talents and passions in a way that is meaningful to you.”  The best way to find out what you like to do and what you are good at is through personal experience.  Take a variety of courses, travel to new places, read about different subjects, volunteer, intern, and try to put yourself in as many different environments as possible.  You might be surprised to find out what you are good at and what you enjoy doing.
  2. Think.  Go somewhere peaceful by yourself and reflect on your life.  Ask yourself a series of questions.  When are you happiest?  When do you feel most confident?  What comes easily for you?  What do people compliment you on most?  Who do you admire?  What problems with our world would you like to fix?  What fascinates you?  Answers to these sorts of questions will shed light on your strengths, interests, and values and give you direction on what type of work to pursue.  If you don’t know what your passions and talents are, you probably need to start paying more attention to how you feel as you live your life. 
  3. Talk.  Find several people you trust, and ask for their help in brainstorming potential career paths based on what they consider your strengths to be.  By talking out loud with those you trust, you may uncover some ideas you had not previously considered.  Just be careful to speak to people who have your best interests at heart and people who will not try to push their desires on you.  It’s also highly recommended to talk to people in any fields you are considering.  You want to know as much as possible about a potential career before you pursue it.
  4. Test.  Career testing can also help you identify your passions and talents.  Several years ago, when I was unsure what to do next in my career, I took the Myers Briggs and Strong Interest Inventory.  The results of these tests helped me reaffirm that I wanted to pursue a career as a speaker, author, and entrepreneur.  Career testing may help you confirm what you already know, or it might shed light on your talents and passions if you are struggling to identify them on your own.  Check with your career center to see what types of career testing they offer.

The hardest part of getting your dream job is figuring out what your dream job is!  If you are not sure what your dream job is, you are certainly not alone.  To take charge of your career and identify your dream job, you need to try, think, talk, and test

Be patient with yourself.  Figuring out what you want to do is a process that usually does not happen as quickly as you would like.  You will probably also find that your career aspirations will change, as you get older and your interests, strenghts, and values evolve.  No matter what happens, remember that you can change directions at any time!  It’s never too late (or too early) to go after your dream job.  The time is always right.  Go after it NOW!

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

Twitter: @peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for The 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

More money does NOT equal more happiness (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 15, 2010

In May of 2008, I left my dream job.

After 5 amazing seasons working for an NBA team, I was ready for a new challenge, for something even “bigger.”  I made the mistake of thinking that more money was the answer.

One of my clients was a very successful business owner making several million dollars a year, and he offered me a position in business development for his company.  Without asking myself if I was interested in and good at the work he wanted me to do, I looked at the income potential and accepted the job.

Over the next 12 months, I got to work for the best boss you could imagine, and I made even more money than I had made working in the NBA.  But, it was the unhappiest, least satisfying period of my career after college.

Don’t get me wrong.  I’m not complaining.  I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to have worked under great management while being compensated very generously.  However, during that year, I felt like my career and my life were purposeless.  Every morning, I would wake up and realize that I had another 8-10 hours doing work that felt meaningless to me

I gave that company everything I had.  However, my performance was nowhere close to the huge sales numbers I posted when working for the Washington Wizards because I was not interested in my work.  Given my lack of enthusiasm and my relatively poor performance, it became nearly impossible for me to enjoy the money I was making. 

After 9 months, I realized it was time for another change.  However, this time, I wanted to make my next move more carefully.

Over the next few months, I went through an intense period of self-reflection in order to identify my values, skills, and interests.  It was not a fast process, but it worked, and it was worth it. 

My turning point came on June 1, 2009.  I was sitting in my bedroom and happened to glance over at my bookshelf.  There were over 100 books that I had read (for fun) over the last 2 years on the topics of personal and professional development.  All of a sudden, it hit me.  Why can’t I motivate and teach others like these authors and speakers have done for me?  More importantly, why can’t I do it right now?

One month later, I resigned my sales job and launched a full-time career as a speaker, author, and service-minded entrepreneur.

Over the next 12 months, I did not make nearly as much money as I did the previous year.  However, I was 10 times happier because I was doing work that mattered to me and that utilized my strengths every day.

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to make money.  I want to make money, too!  However, never let money become the #1 motivator for your career decisions.  More money does not equal more happiness.  More meaning equals more happiness…

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for the 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

Categories: Get Your Dream Job NOW, Passion, Peak Performance, Self-Reflection

Comments: 1 Comment

The Definition of a Dream Job (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

November 11, 2010

“There are 2 great days in a person’s life – the day we are born, and the day we discover why.” – William Barclay

I get a lot of interesting reactions these days when I tell people that I help students and recent graduates get their dream jobs.  Cynics tell me dream jobs don’t exist, pessimists tell me that “you can’t get your dream job in this economy,” and lazy people think I help people find a job where they can earn a 6-figure salary to sit on the beach and drink Corona’s all day.

Most people misunderstand what I mean, so here is my definition of a dream job:

“A dream job is a job that combines your talents and passions in a way that is meaningful to YOU.”

How can you figure out what YOUR dream job is?  Well, you need to answer 3 questions:

1. What are you good at?

2. What are you passionate about?

3. How can you combine these talents and passions in a way that is meaningful to YOU? 

Don’t think of finding a dream job like finding a soul-mate.  There are probably lots of jobs that could be dream jobs for you; finding your dream job is not about finding “the one.”

Another point I need to make is that a dream job is NOT a perfect job.  When I had my first dream job to work for an NBA team, there were still plenty of times and days when I got frustrated.  In my current dream job as a speaker, author, and service-minded entrepreneur, I still have challenging moments and days as well. No job will ever be perfect 100% of the time.  If you expect 100% happiness, you will always be disappointed.

In summary, you won’t find your dream job by chasing a “hot” industry or field, by chasing a job where you think you can make a ton of money, or by chasing the advice being pushed on you by your parents, family, friends, professors, or society.  The only way to find your dream job is to be honest about what matters to YOU.  Look inside, not outside.  The sooner you can do that, the sooner you will find your dream job

This is a process that takes time, but it will definitely be worth it, so be patient!  If you are willing to do whatever it takes, and if you know how/where to look, you can get your dream job in any economy!  Remember: it’s not your job to fix the economy, so don’t worry about the economy.  You just need 1 job!  Why not make it your dream job?…

-Pete Leibman

-Career Expert and Professional Speaker

-President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

Blog: http://CareerMuscles.Wordpress.com

@peteleibman

P.S. I speak about career success to students and young professionals nationwide.  To learn more about my programs and speaking availability for the 2011 Dream Job College Tour, please send an email to Pete@IdealizeNow.com. 

Categories: Get Your Dream Job NOW, Passion, Self-Reflection

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10 Non-Traditional Questions to Determine What Your Dream Job Is (written by Career Expert, Pete Leibman)

August 2, 2010

Hmmm... I wonder what my dream job is?

Considering that the average person will spend 5 million minutes or more at work throughout his/her life (60 minutes in an hour, 40 hours in a week, 50 weeks in a year, and 40 years in one’s life spent working),  a meaningful, satisfying career is clearly a key ingredient for living your ideal life. 

However, many people are unsure what type of work they would enjoy.  While you can brainstorm ideas for jobs/careers with friends, family, or career counselors, perhaps the most powerful exercise of all is to ask yourself a series of questions in order to identify your values, dreams, goals, strengths, weaknesses, and passions.

Here are 10 non-traditional questions to help you generate ideas for your dream job:

  1. What personal struggles or challenges have you overcome?  (After answering this, look for work where you can help others overcome similar challenges.)
  2. When have you been happiest in your life?  (After answering this, look for work that allows you to be in that environment on a consistent basis, and/or look for work that allows you to help other people feel like you have during those times.)
  3. What are the most painful things that have happened to you, your closest friends, or your family members?  (After answering this, look for work that allows you to prevent other people from feeling like you or your friends/family members did during those difficult times.)
  4. What is easy for you that is not easy for others? (After answering this, look for work where you can utilize those skills and strengths.)
  5. What are your favorite hobbies?  (After answering this, look for work connected to these hobbies.)
  6. If you had to read 100 books in 100 days on 1 topic, what topic would you read about?  (After answering this, look for work related to that topic.)
  7. If you had the ability to help any 1 person in any way, how would you do it?  (After answering this, look for work related to helping that sort of person.)
  8. If you were given $1 million to donate to any 1 charity, what charity would you give it to?  (After answering this, look for work related to that cause.)
  9. What problems in our world make you angry?  (After answering this, look for work where you can be involved in fixing these problems.)
  10. If you could be any other person, who would you want to be and why?  (After answering this, look for work that puts you on the path toward becoming that person, or find a job in a related industry.)

There is no universal formula or question that can help each of us identify our dream job, so some of these questions should resonate with you more than others.  The key for the creation of an ideal career is to analyze yourself on a consistent basis to make sure your work is aligned with your values, dreams, goals, strengths, weaknesses, and passions.  Once you have some ideas, you can start researching relevant industries and fields.  The result will be a much better career and a much better life!

-Pete Leibman

Career Expert and President of Idealize Enterprises

Pete@IdealizeNow.com

www.linkedin.com/in/peteleibman

www.IdealizeNow.com

Categories: Get Your Dream Job NOW, Job Search Made Easy, Passion, Peak Performance, Self-Reflection

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